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Ph.D. degree requirements, WE

Program of Study—Working with the faculty advisor, the student will plan a Program of Study having: (1) an emphasis in one of the five areas of welding engineering (welding processes, materials, design, nondestructive evaluation, or plastics joining), (2) significant graduate level content from a second principal area of welding engineering, and (3) a minor field of study in a closely allied field. The program of study will include estimated dates for completing qualifying and candidacy exams. During the student’s first semesterof enrollment the Program of Study is to be submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee for approval.  [Semester-based requirements below.]

Semester-based degree requirements

For graduate students who entered the graduate program in or after Summer term 2012.

I 80 total graduate credit hours are required

A Of these 80 hours, at least 30 must be graded graduate level courses.
Note: Courses selected for the WE Major and Minor concentrations are to come from the five welding engineering areas (processes, materials, design, non-destructive evaluation, or plastics joining).* The External Minor courses are to come from a relevant field outside of WE.

  1. Of these 30 hours at least 16 credit hours are to come from 7000-level course work in WE.
  2. The 30 credit hours are to consist of:
  • Major area of WE concentration. At least 9 credit hours are to come from one of the five WE areas of concentration.
  • Minor area of WE concentration. At least 6 credit hours are to come from one of the remaining areas of concentration.
  • External minor. At least 6 credit hours are to come from a coherent sequence of courses from a degree program outside of WE that supports the student’s area of emphasis. These courses should relate to the student’s field of study unless prior approval has been given by the Graduate Studies Committee.
  • Up to 9 credit hours beyond those above may come from any graded graduate credit that is 5000-level or greater in or outside of WE (these courses should relate to the student’s field of study unless prior approval has been given by the Graduate Studies Committee).

B At least 50 graduate credit hours may come from other courses, besides those listed in A1 & 2, to bring the total graduate credit hours to at least 80.

  1. Of these 50 credit hours, all full-time students are to register for WE 7895 (Graduate Seminar and Colloquium) every AU & SP terms, except in the semester of graduation.
  2. Of these 50 credit hours, at least 20 credits of WE 6/8999 (Research in Welding Engineering) is required. All thesis / dissertation work (WE 6/8999) and research plans are to be approved by the student's advisor.

II Plan of study

Within the first term of enrollment the student is to submit to his/her advisor a plan of study mapping out the proposed course work to meet the requirements above. This plan of study is to be submitted to the WE Graduate Studies Committee Chair for review.

III Qualifying Examination

WE Qualifying Examination procedures
By the end of the second term after entry into the PhD-track, the student is required to pass a Qualifying Examination. The QE will have both a written and oral portion defended before an examining committee.

IV Successful completion of the Candidacy Examination

WE Candidacy Examination procedures
This examination is a comprehensive test of the student’s knowledge of welding engineering and allied fields. The CE is to be taken no sooner than the term in which 30 graded graduate credit hours are completed (i.e., sec. A above). The CE consists of two written portions—drawn from the major and minor WE course work—and one oral portion. The exam is given twice each academic year, in November and May. - A student who passes the exam may petition the Graduate Studies Committee for an MS without Thesis degree after satisfying the MS without Thesis requirements.

V Dissertation Committee Meetings

At least once per year following successful completion of the Candidacy Examination the student is to meet with his/her Dissertation Committee. The first meeting of this committee is to include a dissertation proposal presentation.

VI Presentation and defense of an acceptable dissertation

The dissertation is a scholarly contribution to knowledge in the student’s area of specialization. Through it, the student is to demonstrate a high level of knowledge and the capacity to function as an independent scholar.

The Final Oral Exam tests originality, independence of thought, the ability to synthesize and interpret, and the quality of research presented.

Courses that apply toward the degree:

  • WE courses at the 5000 level or above that may be taken for graduate credit.
  • Non-WE courses at the 5000 level or greater in the hard-sciences, math, and engineering that may be taken for graduate credit.

*Course key for WE concentration areas:

  • Process: #0## (i.e., WE courses with a zero in the hundreds place)
  • Materials: #1## and 7023
  • Design: #2## and 7115
  • Non-destructive Evaluation: #3## and 5038
  • Plastics and Composites: #4##, 5038, and 7201

Rev SU12


Quarter-based degree requirements

For graduate students who entered the graduate program prior to Summer term 2012.

I 120 total graduate credit hours are required

A Of these 120 hours, at least 45 must be graded graduate level courses.

  1. Of these 45 hours, at least 24 must be taken at the 700-level or above in WE.

    a. Of these 24 hours, 15 are to come from one of the WE major program areas (welding processes, materials, design, nondestructive evaluation, or plastics joining). These serve as the student’s WE major area of emphasis.

    b. Of these 24 hours, 9 are to come from a second of the five WE areas and serve as a WE minor area of emphasis.
  2. Of these 45 hours, 9 are to come from a coherent sequence of courses from a degree program outside of WE that supports the student’s area of emphasis (these courses should relate to the student’s field of study unless prior approval has been given by the Graduate Studies Committee).
  3. Of these 45 hours, 12 hours beyond those in A1 & A2 may come from any graded graduate credit that is 600-level or greater in WE or 500-level or greater outside WE (these courses should relate to the student’s field of study unless prior approval has been given by the Graduate Studies Committee).

B At least 75 graduate credit hours may come from other courses, besides those listed in A1, 2, & 3, to bring the total graduate credit hours to 120.

  1. Of these 75 hours, all full-time students are to register for WE 795 (Graduate Seminar and Colloquium) every AU, WI, & SP quarters, except in the quarter of graduation. Part-time students may petition to be exempted from this requirement.
  2. Of these 75 hours, the balance is to come from WE 999 (Research in Welding Engineering). All thesis / dissertation work (WE 999) and research plans are to be approved by the student's advisor.

II Qualifying Examination

WE Qualifying Examination procedures
Within the first year of entry into the PhD-track, the student is required to pass a Qualifying Examination. The QE will have both a written and oral portion defended before an examining committee.

III Successful completion of the Candidacy Examination

WE Candidacy Examination procedures
This examination is a comprehensive test of the student’s knowledge of welding engineering and allied fields. The CE is to be taken no sooner than the quarter in which 45 graded graduate credit hours are completed (i.e., sec. A above). The CE consists of two written portions—drawn from the major and minor WE course work—and one oral portion. The exam is given twice each academic year, in November and May. - A student who passes the exam may petition the Graduate Studies Committee for an MS without Thesis degree after satisfying the MS without Thesis requirements.

IV Dissertation Committee Meetings

Within the first quarter following successful completion of the Candidacy Examination the student is to form a Dissertation Committee. The first meeting of this committee is to include a dissertation proposal presentation.

V Presentation and defense of an acceptable dissertation

The dissertation is a scholarly contribution to knowledge in the student’s area of specialization. Through it, the student is to demonstrate a high level of knowledge and the capacity to function as an independent scholar.

The Final Oral Exam tests originality, independence of thought, the ability to synthesize and interpret, and the quality of research presented.

Courses that apply toward the degree:

  • WE courses at the 600 level or above that may be taken for graduate credit.
  • Non-WE courses at the 500 level or greater in the hard-sciences, math, and engineering that may be taken for graduate credit.