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Centers and collaborations

Centers

The MSE department is home to a number of world-class research centers:

Center for Electron Microscopy and AnalysiS (CEMAS)
Current and future challenges in medicine, healthcare, environment, energy and technology need increasingly to be addressed on length scales ranging from millimetres to the scale of individual atoms.  The delivery of novel solutions in cancer therapies, diseases of an aging population, sustainable functional and structural materials demands a multidisciplinary approach to research.  The Center for Electron Microscopy and AnalysiS (CEMAS) is a centralised, coordinated imaging facility where traditional boundaries between disciplines are eliminated.  Our mission is to deliver new insights and solutions through world-class imaging and analysis to the research community at The Ohio State University and to our academic and industrial partners in Ohio and beyond.

NSF I/UCRC: Manufacturing & Materials Joining Innovation Center (Ma2JIC)
The Center seeks to close the gap between new material development and the joining of these materials. A special emphasis of the Center is on the application of welding technologies to energy industries. Technical needs related to materials joining in fossil energy, nuclear energy, alternative energy, energy efficiency, and energy storage applications can be grouped under six broad categories:

  • joining of existing materials
  • joining of new advanced materials
  • joining of dissimilar materials
  • additive manufacturing for hybrid materials
  • life extension of existing joints
  • rapid evaluation of life of weldments

Center for Emergent Materials (CEM)
The Center for Emergent Materials (CEM) at The Ohio State University is an National Science Foundation (NSF) supported Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC). CEM performs integrated research on emergent materials and phenomena in magnetoelectronics, creating new paradigms in computing and information storage. The research activities conducted at the CEM focus on a new understanding of electron-spin injection and transport, and the synthesis and exploitation of multifunctional properties of innovative double perovskite heterostructures. Education is an important component of our research activities. Our programs take an interactive, constructionist approach to address the nature and cognitive cause of the misconception of materials science concepts.

Fontana Corrosion Center (FCC)
The FCC focuses on the study of corrosion in an effort to protect materials from the harmful effects of degradation. The Center seeks to understand how microstructure affects corrosion, the mechanisms and efficacy of environment-friendly inhibitors, corrosion rates and mechanisms for highly corrosion resistant alloys under conditions relevant to long term storage of nuclear waste, and prediction of corrosion damage accumulation, and other aspects of corrosion. Director: Dr. Gerald Frankel

Center for Accelerated Maturation of Materials (CAMM)
The purpose of CAMM is to integrate computational methods with experimental techniques. This work looks to speed the often lengthy development time involved in bringing a theoretical material through the development stage to final fabrication and use. Director: Dr. Hamish Fraser

Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC)
NSEC carries out advanced research at the nanometer scale. Currently most nanotechnology research remains exploratory, and commercialization is hindered by a great need for mass-producible, reliable, and affordable manufacturing processes. The center is expected to make major breakthroughs in developing affordable manufacturing methods to form, reinforce, bond, and assemble polymer structures at the nanoscale for biomedical and other applications.

Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials (CSMM)
Research at CSMM focuses on the materials science and materials physics of superconductivity and magnetism. This includes structure-properties studies, as well as investigation of phase formation, reaction, diffusion, vortex matter and pinning. Low temperature electrical and magnetic properties are studied, as well as the micro and nanostructure of superconducting and magnetic materials. Director: Dr. Michael Sumption

Collaborations

The Institute for Materials Research (IMR)
The IMR represents more than 150 faculty members and research groups engaged in materials research from 5 colleges and more than a dozen departments at OSU. With a network of state-of-the-art facilities throughout these departments and colleges, IMR provides coordination for a dynamic, world-class and multi-disciplinary materials research community that incorporates science and engineering from the sub-nano to macro scales, from soft to hard materials, from basic phenomena to devices, and from biology and medicine to agriculture, energy, communications, transportation and computation.